Help Centre

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  1. Do I need to grease the doorknob spindle? 24/02/2020

    A small amount of graphite grease should be applied sparingly and only occasionally to the spindle of the doorknob, twice a year is usually sufficient.

    Ashes from the fire have a gritty texture and over time this can cause wear on the doorknob spindle. Use a tiny amount of grease to lubricate the groove in the first thread of the spindle which can be applied with a matchstick or cocktail stick.

    Please note: only a small amount is needed, if too much is used it will melt and dribble down causing an unsightly stain, be sure to remove any excess before relighting the unit.

  2. Can you configure the flue to have an offset so it goes out the wall behind the fire rather than the roof? 24/02/2020

    Yes, offset bends are available for the flue systems. The best option would be to speak with a local installer who can give you specific advice about a flue system to suit your home.

    Do note that a general rule of thumb is to try and avoid having any offsets in the first length of flue pipe, no more than a 45 degree angle and no more than 600mm centre to centre of the offset. Offsets do require more maintenance with cleaning etc. and can have adverse effects on the fires performance versus a typical vertical flue.

     

  3. What are the technical specifications of the Pyroclassic IV? 24/02/2020

    Please see the last page of the Pyroclassic IV brochure, which can be downloaded HERE.

  4. What does it mean by the Pyroclassic being 'Self Regulating'? 24/02/2020

    The vigorous fire near the loading door automatically slows down as the burning front advances through the firebox towards the back. Each cycle ends with ash and hot ember at the far end of the firebox. Only use the Turboslide when lighting, adding fresh fuel or if you quickly want a very vigorous fire. The Pyroclassic® IV not only provides heat soon after start up but it also stores a lot of the heat from burning your wood, you will get most of this heat back over several hours. Frequent reloading may result in high room temperatures but you will soon know how much and how often to add fuel, the best heater output control is how much and how often you do this. The Pyroclassic® IV is designed to save on firewood and to keep emission levels to the minimum by storing the surplus heat which normally goes up the chimney - this heat is still being released into the room even when the fire is low at the end of each burn cycle.

  5. How should I store my wood? 24/02/2020

    Gathering and stacking wood in the open air over the summer period is advantageous because the warmth of the sun and good air circulation will automatically evaporate some of the sap. When the wood gets wet from seasonal rain, the rain water replaces sap and because water is more quickly evaporated, the fuel dries faster.

    Split larger logs, so that the largest surface area of the internal wood is exposed to the atmosphere, stack the wood loosely, on bearers, with the ends facing a prevailing wind, cover with a plastic sheet on a light frame to create a warmhouse effect, with the sides open to the prevailing breeze so it can flow freely through your stack.

    Do not use it until it is fully seasoned, do not stack rotten wood - it has very little useful heat in it and leave the bark on split wood - it helps to provide natural protection from rain.

  6. How does the Pyroclassic IV burn overnight? 24/02/2020

    The overnight burn ability of the Pyroclassic IV is 100% dependent on the quality and size of fuel you put in it.

    You will need to have a good ember bed established, then add 2 or 3 dry hardwood logs (preferably Kanuka) measuring approximately 400mm long by 120mm thick into the fire box. Allow the flames to establish on the front ends of the logs and then ensure the turboslide is fully closed meaning the air flow into the fire is controlled by the fire itself. The further back in the fire chamber you have the fire the longer it will burn for.

    Remember, you need to add a kilo of fuel for every hour burn time required. If you follow these instructions you should have some hot embers left in the back of the fire chamber in the morning ready to be brought forward to establish another fire.

    As a point of caution you should never insert a fresh log which is too large or placed in the fire too late to ensure a flaming combustion, doing this will cook the wood fuel on the remaining embers releasing unburnt volatile gases into the combustion chamber which will eventually reach a point of ignition, this can result in a sizable explosion inside the fire chamber and may cause damage to the unit.

  7. Why are there cracks and deterioration in my Pyroclassic cylinder? 24/02/2020

    This is a natural way to relieve built-up stress in refractories. It has no effect on operation, performance or useful life of the unit. The firebox is an arch structure, the most stable and permanent construction known. These cracks will develop over time and is nothing to worry about. 

    Due to it being cast as a one piece cylinder it goes through some expansion and contraction every time it is heat cycled. This is just the cylinder relieving its inert tension and results in a variety of different levels of cracking. 

    These cracks and blisters can slowly grow over time due to erosion through use. If you do not like the appearance of the cylinder when cracks appear, you can purchase veneering cement which can be mixed to a toothpaste like consistency and inserted into the cracked areas.

    The story goes that the two original designers each had a Pyro and one touched up his cylinder every year and the other never touched his...25 years later both fires were still working albeit one was looked in better looking condition internally than the other!

     25 year-old Pyroclassic II Cylinder 

    IMG 0241

     

  8. I am seeing dense smoke out of my chimney. What is wrong? 24/02/2020

    This can happen if you are burning wet wood, plastic materials, fire retardant-treated wood or high resin content.

    This can also happen if the hot fire chamber is overloaded with wood treated with fire retardant. Do not use such fuel.

    Burn seasoned wood ONLY, ensuring it is positioned lengthwise in the firebox.

  9. How far does the door come out into the room when opened? 24/02/2020

    The door when opened comes out 370mm from the front steel plate, plus 20mm for the door knob. 

  10. What can I do if my wetback develops a thick coating on it? 24/02/2020

    The wetback can develop a coating of crusty creosote when the wood fuel is not being burnt in the most efficient way. Firewood can play a major role in the performance of a wood fire. The species is part of the picture but the most significant thing is that whatever the type of wood it must be well seasoned and dry. Best performance cannot be achieved without the best fuel.

    So back to the question...

    Burning wood at low temperature causes incomplete combustion of the oils in the wood, which are off-gassed as volatiles in the smoke. As the smoke rises through the chimney it cools, causing water, carbon, and volatiles to condense on the interior surfaces of the chimney flue. The black oily residue that builds up is referred to as creosote, which is similar in composition to the commercial products by the same name, but with a higher content of carbon black. Over the course of a season, creosote deposits can become several inches thick. This creates a compounding problem, because the creosote deposits reduce the draft (airflow through the flue) which increases the probability the wood fire is not getting enough air to burn at high temperature. Since creosote is highly combustible, a thick accumulation creates a fire hazard. If a hot fire is built in the stove or fireplace and the air control left wide open, this may allow hot oxygen into the chimney where it comes in contact with the creosote which then ignites—causing a flue fire.

    The easiest way to clean the flue is by placing a deep baking tray or similar under the base of the flue and sweep the flue down into this. This stops all the debris from falling into the top chamber and requiring vacuuming out. The build-up around the wetback is best removed by hand and the rest can be carefully removed by a vacuum cleaner.

    The wetback can be knocked out of alignment if it is moved when the creosote is being cleaned off. This can cause the constant rise to be knocked out of alignment and can result in water hammer developing in the system so be careful. The wetback can develop a coating of crusty creosote when the wood fuel is not being burnt in the most efficient way. Firewood can play a major role in the performance of a wood fire. The species is part of the picture but the most significant thing is that whatever the type of wood it must be well seasoned and dry. Best performance cannot be achieved without the best fuel.